Osvaldo Patrizzi with the help of Mara Cappelletti released another Rolex book that is worthy for anyone interested in Rolex.   A longtime expert in the wristwatch industry, Patrizzi opened an auction house in Italy and then relocated to New York where his firm, Antiquorum became the leading auction house for timepieces.

 

While running auction houses, Patrizzi also publishes wristwatch collector and coffee table books.  Because  information on some of the rarest, and thus most collectible, timepieces are hard to find from knowledgeable sources, Patrizzi publishes books for collectors that are affordable and easy to read.  Patrizzi’s Rolex History, Icons, and Record-Breaking Models is exactly one of these books.  Bound in hardcover, sells on Amazon for a reasonable $40.00, and contains auction-house quality images, Rolex History, Icons, and Record-Breaking Models is a good synopsis for why a watch collector needs a Rolex.

 

Broken into eight primary sections, Rolex History, Icons, and Record-Breaking Models highlights the standout details that make Rolex standout in the industry. Other sections include Rolex history, icons, a fantastic timeline that spans many pages, touchstone Rolex models and record vintage pieces, some background on Rolex’s bleeding edge technology, and of course a glossary.

 

One of the larger sections of Patrizzi’s Rolex History, Icons, and Record-Breaking Models discusses the history of the 100-year-old company.  Rolex history in general contains a number of threads that illustrate utterly smart business acumen, running a business in a foreign land, prehistoric watch technology and technological innovation, a steadfast belief in accuracy and durability, all with an undercurrent of two world wars and keeping the company privately owned.  The Rolex History section of Rolex History, Icons, and Record-Breaking Models discusses these levels without being confusing.

 

Another fantastic section of Rolex History, Icons, and Record-Breaking Models are the pages devoted to specific Rolex models.  The Models section is not a catalog of all the Rolex wristwatches ever made, but rather describes iconic models that have stood the test of time, and the reasons why.  The DateJust series, Explorer series, underwater models, the Day-Date / President, the GMT, the Daytona among others Rolex models are described in the Models section and with the elements that make these particular Rolex models touchstones for the brand.

 

A watch book written and curated by an auction house owner would not be complete without a section devoted to Record Vintage Pieces.  Rolex History, Icons, and Record-Breaking Models devotes a section to Rolex models that sold at auction at prices that would pay for a section at a small hospital.  The Vintage Piece section describes the provenance behind these record breakers, and by association, upholds the Rolex brand image giving Rolex owners another reason to stay with the brand.

 

Lastly, Rolex History, Icons, and Record-Breaking Models has a small section on the technology that make Rolex models reliable and durable.  Rolex developed and owns many patents, but the noteworthy technological breakthroughs are highlighted in this chapter.  A complete list of Rolex patents and technologies would require more pages than the History section of the book, but this section does encapsulate the highlights that any existing or prospective Rolex owner should know.

 

For anyone who is considering purchasing a Rolex, or to help sell a spouse on purchasing a household Rolex, this book is one to have.  At 150 pages, Rolex History, Icons, and Record-Breaking Models does not skimp on details and history.  For prospective Rolex owners fearful of going into a Rolex dealer [other than Fourtané], reading this book before a visit will ease any fears of being bamboozled by the counter help. Rolex History, Icons, and Record-Breaking Models is authoritative, accurate, and very easy to read.  Get it a Amazon and bring it into Fourtané and compare the images in the book to the models Fourtané has in stock; now that would be a fun exercise.

-Sheldon Smith